Category Archives: Public place showing

OSA show moves to CSP Manor

The OSA Fall Juried Show was extended to the CSP Rose Schnitzer Manor, 6140 SW Boundary Street, Portland, thru November 9th. My oils below are exhibited and for sale.

Morley's Farm, 16" x 12" oil on textured plywood
Morley’s Farm, 16 x 12 inch Oil on textured plywood
Dawn on the Colorado, 24 x 18 inch Oil on canvas
Dawn on the Colorado, 24 x 18 inch Oil on canvas
CSP Hallway for paintings
Example of CSP Hallway where my paintings are shown through November 9th.

OSA Fall Juried Art Show

September 8-23
Reception and Awards Ceremony
Sunday, September 8, 1pm-4pm

Dawn on the Colorado, 24 x 18 inch Oil on canvas
Dawn on the Colorado, 24 x 18 inch Oil on canvas

Oregon Society of Artists, 2185 S.W. Park Place, Portland 503-228-0706 
info@osartists.org

Clackamas Artist Exhibit Program

May 3 thru August 1 six of my paintings are shown at the Public Services Bldg Social Services gallery, 2061 Kaen Rd. off Beavercreek Road in Oregon City.

Social Services Waiting area
Social Services Waiting area

Abandoned View, 16x20 Acrylic
Abandoned View, 16×20 Acrylic

Old Grist Mill, 16x20 Oil
Old Grist Mill, 16×20 Oil

Clackamas Arts Alliance Artists’ Exhibit

Richard Gaffield

Beginning May 3 thru August 7 six of my paintings will be shown at the Public Services Bldg Social Services gallery, 2061 Kaen Rd. off Beavercreek Road in Oregon City.

Community Development Gallery

“Richard Gaffield’s mixed media paintings take us to timeless rural country settings.  Wire fences wrestle with sage brush in one open scene, while a flowering pink tree celebrates spring in another.  Like favorite passages of oft-told stories, they take us back to another time and place.”

The paintings are on the 2nd floor of the Oregon City Community Development Building at 221 Molalla Ave for three months and then at Citizens Bank, 19245 Molalla Ave until the end of June.

Library Gallery Brings Artwork Alive

Imagine your artwork on display in a historic home-like setting. A warm fire crackles in the massive brick fireplace, inviting you to relax and read, while rows of dark-toned bookcases envelope the room with riveting subjects to share. Has your artwork been sold to a local book lover? In this case, no! It’s on display at the pARTners in ART gallery space at the Oregon City Library!

Eight of our artists are participating in the January-March rotation, and it’s fascinating to see how the unique literary surroundings add context to their work. Historic subjects, such as Eric Griswold’s photographs of the abandoned Blue Heron Mill or Susan Schenk’s mixed media interpretations of the Donald and Newberg mills, take on extra significance in the century-old library space. Architectural subjects, such as the monumental bridges inspiring both Anita Reuther’s and Eileen Holtzman’s paintings, harmonize beautifully with the strong architectural features of the gallery room. The nostalgic landscape in Richard Gaffield’s “Abandoned View” seems especially compelling as the vacant log cabin and rusty antique sedan take us back in time along with their historic venue.

(2 paragraphs and a photo by Beth  Daniell from her Three Rivers Artist Guild February newsletter. Bolded font my idea. Thank you Beth.)

 

Oregon City Public Places

These watercolors and mixed media will travel from the Three Rivers Gallery to be on view at the 221 Gallery located on the 2nd floor of the Community Development Building at 221 Molalla Ave for three months and then at Citizens Bank,

 

Oregon City public places

3 paintings (ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH, YOUNG TUMBLEWEEDS and JIM’S MARSH) were accepted for hanging at Oregon City Planning Commission, 221 Molalla Ave. GRANDPA’S WHEELBARROW, ABANDONED BARN and GIRL PLAYING JACKS were moved to Oregon City Citizens Bank, 19245 Molalla Ave. They are for sale at each location for 3 months.

Rocky Mountain High, 18 x 24 inch acrylic Young Tumbleweeds, 8 x 10 inch mixed media Jim's Marsh, 11 x 14 inches, mixed media
grandpaWheel_slider-2-1024x624 Abandoned Barn, 10 x 12 inch watercolor Girl Playing Jacks, 8 x 10 inch watercolor

“The 221 Gallery’s 3rd Quarter 2016 rotation brings five uniquely gifted artists together for a display that both soothes and surprises. Despite their differences, each artist contributes to a theme found in Susan’s Schenk’s collage. Her text, “the process of finding pattern” sets the tone for the entire exhibit.
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Richard Gaffield’s “Rocky Mountain High” also makes a strong statement in its orange color, but here, the color belongs to the rising mountain cliffs bordering his view. Reflected in the water below, their strong pattern creates a double image, dwarfing the forest greens and river rock grays between them. Learn more at www.richardgaffield.com.”

Oregon City Public Places

3 paintings (GRANDPA’S WHEELBARROW, ABANDONED BARN, GIRL PLAYING JACKS) were accepted for hanging at Oregon City Planning Commission, 221 Molalla Ave, and Oregon City Citizens Bank, 19245 Molalla Ave, Oregon City. They are for sale at each location for 3 months.

grandpaWheel_slider-2-1024x624 Abandoned Barn, 10 x 12 inch watercolor Girl Playing Jacks, 8 x 10 inch watercolor

From the current Three Rivers Artist’s Guild Newsletter:
“Four artists bring thought-provoking perspectives to the 221 Gallery’s 2nd Quarter 2016 rotation. Richard Gaffield, Michelle Lattanzi, Susan Schenk and Bob Bresky each use their chosen mediums to re-shape familiar scenes with startling perspectives, bringing the mind’s eye into focus.

“Richard’s watercolors and mixed media achieve this within the context of familiar landscapes and objects. “Abandoned Barn” sets the weather-worn building far in the distance. The leaning barbed wire fence in the foreground and the broken wooden rail fence further back set the scene, illustrating how boundaries and buildings, once important, have now been forgotten. “Grandpa’s Wheelbarrow” focuses entirely on the rusted metal wheel, still sturdily anchored by its hefty hardware. “Girl Playing Jacks” makes the small child seem almost fragile by placing her in the corner of the scene, hunched over her jacks and dwarfed by the sharp angled planes of the farmhouse nearby.”